Prone Bridge Protocols

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Component of fitness assessed: Core abdominal strength.

The prone bridge provides an indication of core abdominal strength.

Prior to undertaking this test a member of the Health Promotion Unit will explain the test protocol and provide a demonstration to the group of Applicants. You will then be placed into groups according to your allocated bib number.

Protocol

  1. Applicants will be asked to take a kneeling position on the floor. After the command ‘ready’ is given, place your hands on the floor in front of you with your fingers straight and your elbows ‘soft’. Engaging your core muscles, walk your hands forward, allowing your legs to stretch out behind you. Lean forwards and allow your hands to take your weight, aligning your elbows directly below your shoulders. Lift your belly up from the floor as you extend your spine. With your abdominals lifted, extend your legs straight out behind you and curl your toes under so some of the weight is on the balls of your feet. The body is held in a generally straight line from shoulders to the ankles. This is the position required for the duration of the test.
  2. After starting the test, applicants will be given one chance to correct posture should it stray from the required position.
  3. The test finishes when you (a) hold the correct position for the required length of time, (b) change position or alter your posture for a second time after being given an initial verbal warning, or (c) display excessive shaking
  4. Applicants will be given one attempt only to complete this test, with one allowance for technique correction.

Score Requirement

All applicants must hold the prone bridge position for 60 seconds.

Kind regards,

Russell Kempster
Russell Kempster
Founder and Head Trainer, Prime Motion Training

About the Author

Russell Kempster

Russell Kempster

Russ spent 12 years as a police officer with Victoria Police. The last four years of that time was spent at the Victoria Police Academy as an instructor, where he taught everything from fitness to firearms. He has trained police applicants, as well as recruits undergoing their initial training, experienced serving police officers and was even called on by Victoria Police to help train other would-be police academy instructors.

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